Kathleen Rellihan

Kathleen Rellihan is a digital producer, writer and editor for TravelChannel.com. A Washington, DC, resident, Kathleen's love for adventure travel has inspired her to go dog sledding in Quebec, search for the northern lights in Iceland, learn to surf in Costa Rica and give elephants a bath in Thailand. Kathleen’s next adventure is volunteering as an English teacher in Haiti. Follow Kathleen on Twitter @k_rellihan.

Posts by Kathleen Rellihan

iStock

When we announced our Travel’s Best Fall Foliage Road Trips for 2013, we wanted to hear from our fans. We asked you what we missed on our list and for you to tell us your favorite fall foliage road trip. It was a landslide – The Great Smoky Mountains won out! Behind the Smoky Mountains, fans picked the Blue Ridge Parkway, between Virginia and North Carolina, as another popular spot for a leaf-peeping drive.

Unfortunately, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is closed due to the government shutdown, but you can’t let that stop you. Hop in your car and take in the scenery as you drive around Gatlinburg, a picturesque mountain town nestled in the scenic Smokies. Now is the perfect time — fall colors peak here in mid-October.

Gatlinburg offers more than just a spectacular autumn show. See what else there is to do in this boot-stomping town … other than ooh-ing and ahh-ing at the foliage, of course.

 

You May Also Like:
Travel’s Best Fall Foliage Road Trips
Great Smoky Mountains Road Trip
Things to Do in Gatlinburg

Courtesy of Ballpark Boathouse

A week into the government shutdown, tourists and furloughed employees alike in Washington, DC, are asking, “What do we do now?” While we don’t have the answers for when the shutdown will end or what’s going to be the state of our country after, we do have some ideas to take our mind off the shutdown while it’s happening.

So for those who find yourself in DC with some time on your hands, here are a few things to do:

Churchkey

Enjoy Happy Hour … All Day Long
Drink your debt-ceiling worries away at the numerous bars and restaurants in the district that are offering shutdown specials. Nothing like a little comfort food or cocktails to ease stress and put a smile on your face. Check out Washington Post’s growing list of places to eat and drink for less during the shutdown.

See DC From the Water
Tourists and locals should take a chance to see the city from another angle  — from the water.  Ballpark Boathouse, the only public boat rental open during the shutdown, is extending their kayak rental season by staying open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays as long as the government shutdown continues (and until the water temperature hits 55 degrees).

Photo by Kathleen Rellihan

Check Out Other Neighborhoods
Tourists might normally stick to the Mall and downtown, but the shutdown of the National Monuments is the perfect excuse to see less tourist-trodden territory. Escape downtown and head to the eclectic U Street neighborhood for a taste of African-American history, indie shopping and inventive restaurants. And on Saturdays, you can check out the new District Flea for some wallet-friendly shopping.

Take Up a New Hobby
Out of work? Put those idle hands to use by learning a new craft. Fibre Space in Old Town, Alexandria, is offering free knitting lessons for federal workers on any day the government is closed. Or perhaps you have always wanted to try yoga, but didn’t have the time. STROGA yoga studio in DC is offering free noon classes to those with a government ID.

Get Snap Happy Outside of DC
While there might not be any photo snapping of national monuments for the time being, tourists and locals can see a different side of the area by taking a photo safari outside of the city. Shoot the barns and bridges in nearby Frederick, MD, or capture the morning light in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, just an hour’s drive away. Or head out on a leaf-peeping adventure outside DC now that fall foliage is starting to peak in the area.

No matter where you are in the US, don’t let the government shut down your vacation.  Here are travel alternatives outside DC during the shutdown.

You May Also Like:

DC’s Hottest New Restaurants
Best Bars in Washington, DC
Presidential Hangouts in DC

 

Photography by Jeff Folger

Fall is here. And that’s means one thing – it’s time to get outside and photograph fall’s spectacular colors.  To help you on your way, we caught up with Jeff “Foliage” Folger, a New England fall foliage photographer and sage for over a decade, to get his tips and tricks for capturing autumn’s stunning scenes year after year.

An expert adviser on our Travel’s Best Fall Foliage Road Trips 2013, Folger has a passion for fall foliage and loves photographing autumn’s seasonal show. Folger also writes his own blog, Exploring New England’s Fall Foliage, where, in addition to showcasing his photography, he shares tips on planning and locating foliage, as well as tracking down peak times.

Check out our Q&A with Jeff:

Traveling Type: How did you become a “fall foliage sage” and photographer?
Jeff “Foliage” Folger:  The photography started when my father gave me a small camera back in the late ’60s and taught me how to develop black and white film in our basement. I kept up with cameras through the next 30-odd years, but only as a hobby. Then, when I retired from the Air Force and settled in Salem, MA, I set out to explore the fall foliage season — making all the rookie mistakes. Over the next 10 years, I would be on the road from late September until the end of October, and Yankee magazine asked me to be their first foliage blogger. My job was to drive all over New England and tell folks where I found the best fall colors.

And how did you get your moniker — Jeff “Foliage” Folger?
During my first year blogging with Yankee, my editor started calling me Jeff “Foliage” Folger during podcasts. A few years down the road, a local radio talk show host added the title “Foliage Sage” (and “Arboreal Oracle” which is my favorite).

Where is your favorite place to go leaf peeping?
My favorite place? Any place that I haven’t been before! I love discovering new places and sharing them with my readers. The most honest answer is a bit sappy, but when I have Lisa, my wife, with me and I can share a new place with her, that makes it special. My website lists locations by state. It will never be finished, but I load a few new places on that website each year.

What’s the biggest misconception about fall foliage?
There are so many misconceptions. Where to start? First: “peak fall color” … everyone comes looking for the “peak.” Most people would be so much happier if they never heard this term. You see “peak” is more an ideal, and it rarely happens – it’s when every tree in sight changes at the same time and at the same rate. In reality, if you see 80-90% of the trees in their fall colors, you will be blown away.

Photography by Jeff Folger. Route 112, New Hampshire.

You mention in your blog the art of getting lost” while leaf-peeping. What do you mean by this? 
The art of getting lost is nothing more than getting off the well-known routes, like the Kancamagus Highway. Everybody (including me) loves to travel Route 112 between I-93 and Conway, NH. But not many think to take Route 112 west away from the “Kanc,” where you’ll find Lost River Road and Kinsman Notch. From there you can travel up Route 16 and find red barns surrounded by sugar maples. I don’t want anyone to get lost, but I want you to look at a good map and look for interesting features and see where it takes you.

Why do certain places in the country, like the Northeast, have more vibrant fall foliage?
I’ve talked to the forestry officials and they tell me it’s because there are over 70 varieties of deciduous trees. And then the fact that New England has the highest concentration of sugar and red maples in the country. These 2 types of maples provide the most vibrant yellow/orange leaves and scarlet red leaves.

What’s your forecast for this fall — the best place and best spot to see fall foliage?
The best place to see fall color is wherever you find yourself. Just being out in nature and exploring the wonders of our world is the prize. If you happen to find a path with golden maple leaves above and a carpet of colors on the ground to go with it, then you have really found the best place.

Jeff “Foliage” Folger in his element photographing New England’s fall foliage.

How do you keep it fresh (photographing fall foliage every year)?
For me, there are places have become old friends that I like to stop in and see how they have changed. Also, New England is really a big place and every year I find new places to explore. Every turn of the wheel brings something I’ve never seen before. Until I have explored every road, it will remain fun for me. Plus, I get to meet great people working the land or in small stores and they all have great stories to tell.

What are the most essential tips for any aspiring photographer to know?
Shoot to make yourself happy. If you are shooting but it’s just a job, then you’ll learn to hate the photography after a while. I take the shots that make me happy and if I’m lucky, a few other people will like them, too.

What are the biggest gaffes you’ve made photographing fall foliage?
Not using a tripod and thinking that if I hold my breath I can hold the camera still enough to not blur the image. It doesn’t usually work.

 

What’s your favorite photo of fall foliage that you have taken?
There are so many favorites and all of them are tied to memories of traveling with my wife. One that sticks out in my mind was our first time to Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts. It’s a 1730s village brought to life by actors. Lisa and I took a boat ride on their little pond and it was cloudy and misting but the colors were so perfect.

Jeff Folger’s favorite fall foliage photograph, taken in Sturbridge Village, Massachusetts.

What are the top places you have yet to capture – that you want to?
This one is easy. I want to spend a lot more time in Maine looking for moose and other scenes. Then, I’d like to more completely cover Rhode Island and Connecticut. Not to mention the Berkshires and western Massachusetts. In 10 years I’ve only scratched the surface.

****

Get more tips in Jeff “Foliage” Folger’s Fall Photography Tips.

We want to see your photos of fall foliage! Take your best shot and submit your favorites in our community gallery.

Before you plan your leaf-peeping drive, check out Travel’s Best Fall Foliage Road Trips.  And don’t forget to vote for your favorite spot to see fall colors!

What’s not to love about fall? Crisp cool air, beautiful fall foliage, spooky sites and pumpkin-flavored food galore. There’s no shortage of ways to celebrate fall, but we whittled down our list to 7 of our favorite fall to-dos.

1.     Eat pumpkin … everything.

Ah, America’s favorite gourd — pumpkin! It’s everywhere and in everything this fall — pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin bagels, pumpkin fro-yo, the list is endless. If you’re gaga for this gourd, plan a day for picking your own pumpkins. Perhaps a 1,000-lbs. pumpkin will provide enough filling for your dishes this fall?

2.     Get lost in a corn maze.

Ever just want to get away … in a massive field of cornstalks? Now’s your chance to get lost in the coolest and creepiest corn mazes in the US. Can you make it all the way through 45 acres of twists and turns in the world’s largest corn maze? Just call us if you get lost.

3.     Get spooked at a vampire haunt.

The zombie fad may be passé this year, but the undead superstar that will never lose its appeal? Vampires. Sink your teeth into these vampire haunts around the world or follow the trail of literature’s greatest bloodsuckers with a vampire vacation.

4.     Take a leaf-peeping drive.

Nothing says fall more than leaf peeping, and what’s the best way to take in Mother Nature’s spectacular autumn show? On a road trip, of course. Get inspired with our favorite fall foliage drives and don’t forget to check the peak times before you go.

5.     Raise your steins for Oktoberfest.

Can’t make it to Germany for this annual beer-fueled fall festival? Get your brews and bratwurst at these Oktoberfest celebrations in the US or raise your steins at beer gardens around the world.

6.     Go apple picking.

If you gorged yourself on pumpkin and are craving another harvest favorite, head to these apple-picking farms.  Fun for the whole family, apple picking lets you enjoy the fruits of your labor at home with fall treats like apple pie, apple butter, cider and more.

7.     Make a campfire.

Instead of spending your nights staring at the TV (Breaking Bad is over after all this Sunday), take in a campfire. Fall is a perfect time for camping with its crisp, cool weather. Tell ghost stories and toast pumpkin s’mores over a raging fire (that you will safely put out before you go to bed, of course).

Tell Us: What’s on your fall to-do list?

 

Let’s say you get lucky and win this month’s trip to Monte Carlo … you’re going to need a whole new wardrobe, right? Lucky for us, the jet-setting editors at L-atitude, a site that offers travel and fashion lovers a way to shop by destination, provided us with a few things to pack for a luxe vacation in Monte Carlo. Just click on the shopping icon on the image above to see L-atitude’s picks for what to wear in Monte Carlo. The good news is that even if you don’t win this month’s trip giveaway to Monte Carlo, you can look like you just got back from the French Riviera anyway with these fashion finds.

And what’s one of the top things to do in Monte Carlo? Shop, of course. L-atitude also shares their favorite places to shop in Monte Carlo, from the super-luxe mall Galérie du Métropole to the funky flea market Les Puces de Fontvieille. There’s even some shopping for the men — try Formula 1, a boutique that has everything from racing helmets to model cars among its mementos of the Monaco Grand Prix.

So if you haven’t entered the Monte Carlo sweepstakes, now is the time before September ends! And remember, you’ll need something for the beach and casino that says “glamorous globetrotter,” so you better start shopping, too.

 

You May Also Like: 
Win a Trip to Monte Carlo
Monte Carlo Shopping Guide
Luxury Vacation in Monte Carlo

No matter where you are in September — at home or on the road — you can celebrate National Yoga Month all over the US. Thousands of studios across the country are participating in National Yoga Month and offering a free week of yoga. This is a perfect time for newbies who want to see what all the fuss is about or for Vinyasa veterans to try out a new studio. (See which studios in your area are participating at yogahealthfinder.com.)

We caught up with traveling yogi Kelly Newsome, owner of Higher Ground Yoga, a boutique yoga and wellness practice in Washington, DC. Newsome teaches simple self-care strategy and private yoga so that busy professionals can take their yoga — and wellness practices — with them no matter where they go.

Check out our Q&A with Newsome, who shares her tips for practicing yoga on the road.

 

Traveling Type: How can people take their yoga (beginning or advanced) with them on the road?

Kelly Newsome: My clients travel constantly, especially for work, and their biggest challenge is staying committed to their practice when their schedules change. To combat this, I give them 3 easy ways (“the 3 Cs”) to stay on track:

No. 1, calendar it! Put 5 to 15 minutes of yoga practice in your physical schedule. If possible, practice in the morning before the day kicks in (but a few restorative poses before bed are great, too). You can always add on more time, but you’re more likely to succeed if you shoot for consistency, not duration.

No. 2, create a super-simple sequence. Don’t try to create that amazing Vinyasa flow series you took a couple of weeks ago with your favorite teacher, or worry about having the perfect playlist or even your special yoga clothes. Instead, start with a few rounds of sun salutations to warm up, then add 3 to 5 favorite poses that you simply, slowly open into. Hold them for a few breaths to deepen their effects. Eliminate unnecessary distractions. Just move, and be in your body. Inhale. Exhale.

Finally, carry a travel yoga mat with you. You don’t actually have to have a mat to practice, but it does make postures easier (hotel towels aren’t as easy to use as you might think — I’ve been there). Plus, not only does a simple travel mat keep your feet and hands from slipping, it can also serve as a valuable visual reminder. Roll it out next to your bed when you arrive at your destination, and let it be your cue to start stretching!

Kelly Newsome practicing yoga in Indonesia.

What are the benefits of combining yoga with traveling, in your opinion?

First, yoga is a perfect complement to traveling because it grounds you, whereas travel actually shifts the ground right from under you! In yoga, you practice conscious awareness of your feet on the earth, the relationship of your body to space, the minute details of the physical environment (for instance, with a gaze point or “drishti”). When my clients are traveling, they’re speeding through time (whether on a train, airplane, car, etc.) and their heads spin, but yoga helps keep their senses from skyrocketing.

Second, traveling can be tough on your physical body because so much sitting is involved — my clients always have grumpy hips, back and shoulders. But yoga’s perfect for that. Its history even tells us that poses were specifically designed thousands of years ago to help meditating yogis sit comfortably for longer periods of time! Many postures take care of those common problem areas.

Third, yoga is low maintenance and available worldwide. I always remind my clients that they really only need their bodies (and, if possible, their travel mats). They use our private podcasts while traveling, but you can find classes just about everywhere these days. Even if you don’t have a physical teacher nearby, though, instruction is available online, by podcast, phone apps or magazines and books you can toss in your bag.

Where are your favorite places to practice yoga away from home?

I’ll pull out a mat anywhere! Still, most of the time my mat stays in the comfort of my home, near my sanctuary table and the fireplace (yep, I even turn it on in the summer — it’s like India!). I also love going to classes in my old home where I did all of my training: New York City. My all-time favorite practice was in Indonesia, though. I was volunteering at an ashram, teaching kids yoga, and they had this massive, dark grey stone plank that jutted out into the middle of the ocean. I went out one evening with my mat and my camera, and saluted the sunset for hours.

Why is September’s National Yoga Month a good time for beginner (or advanced) yogis?

September is a month that symbolizes new beginnings. Nearly all of my clients, for instance, have children starting the school year. It’s a time of possibility and fresh, crisp energy!

Kelly Newsome owns Higher Ground Yoga, a boutique wellness practice in Washington, DC,  for busy women. Her business story has been featured in Bloomberg Law, and the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling book, The $100 Startup, and she was voted as one of the top 3 yoga teachers by the Washington City Paper’s “Best of DC 2013.”  Before her wellness work, Kelly was a business attorney and, in between careers, she spent time traveling, eating, consulting, riding elephants and teaching her yoga craft in Cambodia, Indonesia, France, Italy and the United Kingdom. 

You May Also Like:
Best Places to Go “Om”
Fitness Tips from Jennifer Aniston’s Yoga Teacher
Wanderlust Oahu: Yoga, Music and Surf

Meet Matt Long — he’s Our Type of Traveler. An experiential traveler at heart, Matt shares his adventures with thousands of readers every day through his site LandLopers.com. As someone who has a big case of the travel bug, Matt travels the world in order to share tips on where to go, what to see and how to experience the best the world has to offer. Based in Washington, DC, Matt has been to more than 60 countries and all 7 continents. Check out his blog, and follow him on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Traveling Type: How did you get started travel blogging?

Matt Long: At the time I was working as a lobbyist for a trade association and just didn’t find my job fulfilling. I started the site as a way to help friends and share my adventures, and now it’s my full-time job and undeniable passion.

What’s your blog about?

Like most blogs, my blog is about me and the way I like to travel. I love adventure and experiential travel, but I also like coming back to a comfortable hotel room. Luxury adventure is usually how I describe it, but with an emphasis on adventure.

How many countries, cities and continents have you traveled to?

I’ve been to around 60 countries, who knows how many hundreds of cities, and 7 continents.

What’s your favorite place you’ve traveled to?

Hard question and it depends on “favorite” for what. Paris is my favorite city, New Zealand is my favorite place for adventure travel and Jordan is a great place for foodies. But most countries I visit hold a soft spot in my heart.

What’s your favorite place to get away from it all?

The Bahamas, there is just something so peaceful about the islands and with so many Out Islands to explore it’s never the same trip twice.

What’s your must-have item that you never travel without?

Other than my passport and camera? My battery pack to keep my iPhone always charged is a must-have for me.

What’s your favorite travel app?

I swear by TripIt, it keeps all of my travel information stored in one place and is indispensible for trips.

 

What’s the best thing you’ve eaten while traveling, and where was it?

Simple meal of chicken and fried basil at a riverfront restaurant in Bangkok. I go every time I visit and it has some of the best food in the city.

What’s the best hotel/resort/hostel you’ve stayed at?

Yikes, hard question! I’ve stayed at some great ones, but the 2 Four Seasons resorts on the Hawaiian island of Lanai are  hotels I love and never get tired of visiting.

Where’s “home”?

Washington, DC, but it’s also whenever I’m with my loved ones and my 3 furry kids, Siberian huskies that are always hard to leave behind when I travel.

What would you recommend to travelers visiting your hometown?

To plan an evening at the beautiful Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts. It’s the only national park of its kind in the US and an evening listening to great music under the stars is a quintessential DC moment that we locals usually keep to ourselves.

What’s No. 1 on your bucket list? 

Not usually a fan of bucket lists, but I really want to explore India. I’ve never been, I’ve heard mixed things but I have to admit that it really intrigues me.

 

You May Also Like:

Our Type of Traveler: Lola Akinmade Åkerström

Our Type of Traveler: Johnny Jet

 

 

Courtesy of Smithsonian’s National Zoo

Two Sumatran tiger cubs were born at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC, on Monday evening.  Not only are these cubs the cutest new zoo babies around, but they are also a huge conservation success for the zoo, since Sumatran tigers are critically endangered – there are only 400-500 left in the wild.

Don’t run to the National Zoo just yet to see the lil’ cubs. The zoo is giving the first-time mother – 4-year-old Sumatran tiger Damai — time to bond and care for her little ones, so the cubs will most likely not be on exhibit until the fall.

In the meantime, you can watch the newborn tigers grow (they haven’t even opened their eyes yet) on the zoo’s live webcams. And their dad, 12-year-old Sumatran tiger Kavi is holding down the den as usual at the Great Cats exhibit.

“It’s taken more than 2 years of perseverance getting to know Damai and Kavi and letting them get to know each other so that we could reach this celebratory moment,” Great Cats curator Craig Saffoe said in a release.

“All I can do is smile because the team has realized our goal of producing critically endangered tiger cubs. Damai came to us as a young tiger herself, so it’s really special to see her become a great mom.”

In addition to these rare cubs, there are only 65 Sumatran tigers living in accredited zoos in North America.

Check out more photos and videos of the tiger cubs here. And take a look at our roundups of adorable animal newborns: zoo babies, aqua babies, safari babies and snow babies.

 

You May Also Like:

America’s Wildest Zoos
Sleeping With the Animals
Best Aquariums in the US

REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

The world finally returned to normal after last week’s royal baby mania with less-than regal celebrations this week like a flash mob pillow fight in Ukraine, the Lumberjack World Championships in Wisconsin and the so-called Mud Olympics in South Africa. See more highlights from the week in This Week in Photos.

Check out more travel buzz on our radar this week:

Twitter-Themed Hotel: Is this the future of travel? Daily Mail UK goes inside an anti-digital detox stay at @SolWaveHouse hotel in Majorca, the world’s first Twitter-themed hotel. Check in and order room service by hashtag? We say it’s #brilliant

Swimming with Sharks: Intrepid blogger LandLopers doesn’t just watch Shark Week — he lives it while swimming with whale sharks in Mexico. There’s nothing to fear, he says — they’re just very large fish.

Call it a Comeback: Gadling shares the top tourist spots that were once  “no-go zones” for travelers. Better put these new-and-improved cities — like Berlin, Buenos Aires and New Orleans — back on your radar.

Keep Calm and Don’t Carry On: Skift reveals the latest new hidden airline fee popping up. More and more budget airlines, like Spirit and now Frontier Airlines, are charging for carry-on bags. Our advice? Fly in cargo pants.

Fancy Yourself a Gypset? What’s that, you say? Our favorite travel shopping portal, L-Atitude showcases the globetrotting gal who coined the term “Gypset” and the iconic style — gypsey meets jet set — it symbolizes.

Photography by Stephen Digges/Getty Images

For those addicted to the rush of bargain hunting, it’s time to gear up for the mother of all yard sales. Clear your schedule and round up some cash for 127 Corridor, better known as “The World’s Longest Yard Sale” – it begins today and continues through Sunday.

This mammoth outdoor market starts in Addison, MI, and stretches for a whopping 690 miles along US Highway 127 to Gadsden, AL. Over the past 25 years, this giant yard sale has doubled in size across 6 states, with great finds including antiques, collectibles and furniture. Along the way, visitors can soak up the flavor of each region as they bargain hunt with vendors’ homemade treats and local entertainment.

If you’re one of the yard sale lovers that will set out on this treasure hunting pilgrimage, here are some tips from our sister blog, Design Happens:

  • Expect to be stuck in traffic. Narrow roads + lots of cars = having to wait patiently.
  • Bring cash.  Bring more if you’re looking for large furniture pieces. Bring more than that if you’re looking for true antiques and valuables.
  • Bring a measuring tape. Also, measure any spaces at home that you may be looking to fill.
  • Ask locals where to eat. Some of the better eats may be off the beaten path.
  • If you see something you like, buy it. Otherwise you may be thinking about the one that got away all day.

 

Don’t worry, there are still plenty of bargains to be found after this weekend, too. Check out our World’s Best Flea Markets to score more great finds.

 

You May Also Like:
Things to Do in August
Best US Outlet Mall Destinations
Andrew Zimmern’s Favorite Food Markets

 

 

 

Latest Pins on Pinterest

  • Page, Arizona

  • Connemara, Ireland

  • Surat Thani, Thailand

  • Surat Thani, Thailand