ALL POSTS IN [History]

The Grand Canyon (Photo Courtesy of Alan Majchrowicz/Getty Images)

We’ve shared our list of the world’s most endangered sites, but today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation revealed its 2015 list of America’s 11 most endangered historic places. The list highlights examples of the country’s architectural, cultural and natural heritage that are at risk of destruction or irreparable damage.

“For more than a quarter-century, our list has called attention to threatened, one-of-a-kind treasures throughout the nation and galvanized local communities to help save them,” says Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Without further ado, here’s a quick look at the places that made the diverse list this year, in alphabetical order.

Curtis P-40 Warhawk Airplanes

Curtis P-40 Warhawk Airplanes

For the first time, in celebration of the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe (V-E) Day, aircraft used during World War II will fly over the National Mall in Washington, DC, on Friday at 12:10 p.m. The planes will start their journey  from the Culpeper and Manassas regional airports in Virginia, ultimately making their way along the Potomac River to the National Mall in DC, where the first formation will come together over the Lincoln Memorial.

Part of the Arsenal of Democracy World War II Victory Capitol Flyover, the event will include more than 25 types of historic planes flying in formations that represent not just V-E Day but several significant milestones in World War II, including Pearl Harbor.

Can’t make it to DC this Friday? Not to worry! Watch the celebration online through a live webcast.

For more information on Friday’s event — and for details on how to see the aircraft up close on Saturday at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles International Airport — visit

Photo Courtesy of Annimei/iStock/Getty Images

April 15 will make it 150 years since President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theatre. President Obama is expected to issue a proclamation making April 15, 2015, a Day of Remembrance for Lincoln. And if you’re planning a trip to Washington, DC, you may want to buy tickets to the Crime Museum’s new Assassinations in the Capital tour.

Mardi Gras in New Orleans

Mardi Gras in New Orleans (Photo: Getty Images)

“Fat Tuesday” is observed around the world, but only in New Orleans can you celebrate with the true flair of a party-ragin’ Cajun. There’s plenty to do during one of the biggest annual celebrations in America. And in a multilingual city with a rich French colonial history, there are myriad options for Carnival fun. It’s no coincidence that The Big Easy is sometimes referred to as the “most unique in the United States,” and this annual bead-begging bash shows exactly why.

A direct flight from New York to New Orleans is about 3 hours. From Los Angeles it’s just 1 hour more. And from Washington, DC, it’s only a 2 1/2 -hour jaunt, all of which makes it easy to jump right into the Mardi Gras mix. Once you arrive in New Orleans you’ll want a comfy place to rest up and energize from the day’s travels. Here are a few suggestions for enjoying Mardi Gras in New Orleans that will fit almost any budget. READ MORE

Photography by Walter Bibkow / The Image Bank / Getty Images

Cuba has long been the holy grail of travel destinations for many American passport holders, tempting them with the difficulty — or, for many, the near impossibility — of ever traveling there. For decades, US citizens who wanted to visit the island had to apply for special licenses, justify their travel to government agencies, or avoid the law altogether by entering Cuba via other countries.

But starting Friday, things get a whole lot easier. Under the new standards, travelers can visit Cuba without applying for a license if they qualify under one of 12 categories of authorized travel, which include family visits, research, education, public performances and humanitarian projects.

Last night on the 2-hour season premiere of the all-new Travel Channel series Expedition Unknown, host Josh Gates embarked on an expedition to investigate what might be the most iconic unsolved case in history, the disappearance of Amelia Earhart.

Josh began his exploration in Papua New Guinea, the last takeoff point for Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan’s plane. Before heading off to Fiji, Josh connected with a remote tribe, which helped lead him through the jungle in an attempt to recover potential pieces of evidence.

Once he arrived in Fiji, the real adventure began. Tracking down the latest and most shocking piece of evidence to date, Josh turned his attention to a small piece of aluminum that washed up on the remote island of Nikumaroro in 1991. Historians believe this could be a unique piece of sheeting installed on Earhart’s plane before her ill-fated flight.

Could Josh’s find, which led to a new article in this month’s issue of Smithsonian magazine, be the key to determining what happened to Earhart?

You May Also Like:

Temple of Doom Pictures

World’s 8th Wonder Pictures


Photography by Emmanuel Brunner

As host of the Mysteries at the Museum franchise, it’s no surprise that Don Wildman has seen some of the creepiest and oddest places around the globe. But which one of those eerie places left the host with the biggest chill? We asked him that very question, and his answers may surprise you.

Japanese Torii Gate

Japanese Torii Gate

by: Brian Leonard, Executive Producer

In July, I was lucky enough to travel to Hiroshima, Japan, from the Washington, DC, area for a shoot. I was working on an exciting new pilot for Travel Channel that looks at places where something big once occurred — either manmade or natural — that changed the place forever, and we find out what makes it different today. It’s a very inspiring project, and I wanted to feature cities that are not the “normal” vacation and tourist destinations. So Hiroshima was a great place to start. READ MORE

Mercedes House (Photo Courtesy of Neil R)

Overwhelmed by New York’s neon canyons? Wary of running with the tourist hordes? If you’re “Times Squared-out,” you can visit an authentic part of New York City just a short distance away. Explore Hell’s Kitchen, the area roughly bordered by Port Authority and 57th Street to the north and south, and 8th Avenue and the Hudson River to the east and west.

This once-raffish neighborhood was home to bad-boy Travel Channel host Anthony Bourdain. Today, it thrives with restaurants, bars and opinionated, demanding locals. Parts of Hell’s Kitchen also offer peace and quiet — something visitors may think is unattainable in New York. Here are a few rough and refined recommendations on what not to miss in this hood: READ MORE

Fort McHenry

Photography By National Park Service

As Francis Scott Key watched the smoke clear and the sun rise above Baltimore’s Fort McHenry after witnessing its bombardment by British naval ships during the final months of the War of 1812, he had every expectation of seeing a white flag of surrender. To his surprise, he saw the tattered, but still flying, remains of an oversized American flag that had been commissioned just months earlier by the fort’s commander Major George Armistead.

Key was so moved by the by sight of the flag and by the Americans’ protection of their fort that he penned the poem “Defence of Fort M’Henry.” That poem, eventually set to music and renamed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” became the national anthem of the United States of America. READ MORE

Latest Pins on Pinterest

  • Jeronimos Monastery in Belem, Lisbon via @travelsewhere

  • The Synagogue in Coptic Cairo via @locdadventures

  • Serengeti National Park via @travelationship

  • Saint Giles Cathedral #Edinburgh via @mental_shot