ALL POSTS IN [Museums and Memorials]

Photography by Getty Images

Brazil lost one of its geniuses this week. Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer passed away on Wednesday, but he left behind a legacy of work that tourists and locals will admire forever. The 104-year-old architect was known for his modernist design style and he collaborated with other architects to design memorable works of art such as the United Nations building in NYC.

In 1959, Niemeyer was tasked with designing Brasilia from the ground up when it was chosen as Brazil’s new capital. He was the chief architect responsible for many public buildings — breathing life into a city once steeped in its colonial and baroque past.

Today, his architecture can be found all around the world, including Place du Colonel Fabien in Paris, the Cathedral of Brasilia, Mondadori Publishing Company’s headquarters in Milan and the Niteroi Contemporary Art Museum in Rio de Janeiro.

Niemeyer’s curvaceous style has inspired young architects to dream, and tourists may feel inspired after visiting the Oscar Niemeyer International Cultural Center in Asturias, Spain, or the Oscar Niemeyer Museum (NovoMuseu) in Curitiba, Brazil.

Trish in Egypt

Today we lost a friend and a fellow traveler after a long battle with breast cancer: Trisha Creekmore, a TravelChannel.com contributor, who wrote about going au naturel in the Caribbean, adrenaline highs in Peru, and yes, even finding pirates. Trish’s animated, energetic and fearless voice, along with her irrepressible sense of adventure, inspired all of us to seize the day. Simply put, she represented the spirit of a true traveler.

That same spirit became her mantra in her fight against cancer. To say  she lived her life to the fullest would be an understatement: Following her diagnosis in 2003, Trish committed to traveling more. Soon she did just that, setting off with her husband David and 2 small daughters to places far and wide, from an epic 4-week trip to the Middle East to a Christmas getaway in the Yucatan. She even signed up with the circus, performing a trapeze act at DC’s Trapeze School of New York.

But Trish’s experiences were not just her own. She made sure of that through her social media campaign, “Cancerpalooza,” in which she empowered fellow cancer survivors and their families to find a shared sense of community and yes, humor, through what Trish simply called a “nasty disease.” With a life-affirming, rock star defiance, Trish continued to travel the world with her family, packing in enough adventures to fill a lifetime and then some. (That includes, in true Trish fashion, collecting rockstar boob-ographs from the likes of Ozzy Osbourne.)

Trish’s husband David blogged about her unbelievable journey each week, providing family, friends and outsiders with an honest perspective of what living with cancer really meant to Trish and her immediate family. The amazing partnership that Trish and David shared led South by Southwest to invite the two to speak about Crowdsourcing Cancer Support at their annual event this past year. Then the cancer returned.

Today, in remembering Trish, we’d like to share a few of her words with you, so that you can see the world — if only for a few minutes — from the perspective of a true adventurer. Read about her family adventure in Egypt, and learn more about her, and Cancerpalooza, on her blog.

October is also Breast Cancer Awareness Month. So whether you’re traveling or not, we ask that you take time out to honor breast cancer survivors and remember those whom we’ve lost, but who lived their lives with strength, humor and good courage.

 

This Saturday is Smithsonian’s Museum Day Live! – an annual event where museums around the country admit visitors for free. But the Smithsonian museums are always free, you say? You’re right, but the famous institution is making this true for many more museums nationwide for one day only. READ MORE

by Oyster.com Staff

One of the world’s most celebrated cultural centers has tons of sight-seeing, tremendous food and breathtaking views.

Rome

Dubbed the “eternal city,” Rome boasts a history that dates back two-and-a-half-thousand years. Stunning Renaissance architecture stands alongside ancient ruins, and iconic structures such as the Colosseum and the Pantheon are some of the world’s most-visited sites. In fact, Rome is the third most-visited city in Europe, coming in just after Paris and London. Already a bustling city, Rome can become almost innavigable during peak season. However, the city is at least very pedestrian-friendly, with many streets closed to traffic and a solid metro and bus system. But be sure to bring a map along — the winding, narrow streets can be confusing. READ MORE

Photography by Lisa Singh

They fought back.

Visitors to the Flight 93 National Memorial may not know exactly what happened in this stretch of rural Pennsylvania on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, but they know this much: The passengers and crew of United 93 fought back that day.

That single act, marked with violent clarity by an impact crater left in the crash’s wake, has drawn 350,000 visitors to the memorial site near Shanksville, PA, over the past year alone — a total of 1.8 million visitors since September 2001.

Visitors from all walks of life come here: leather-clad bikers, Amish from the surrounding countryside, retirees from the Midwest, families with small children. Once a year, a woman from Japan visits to remember her 20-year-old son Toshiya Kuge — one of 40 individuals who perished onboard United 93 that morning at 10:03 a.m., when the Boeing 757 careened from the sky and came crashing to the earth, having flipped on its belly, at 563 miles per hour. READ MORE

Photograph by Oyster.com

Dubbed “the Venice of the North” for its many waterways, Stockholm offers the best of both worlds — a booming metropolis steeped in culture and history, without the dingy feel of some of the other big cities in Europe. One of the cleanest cities of its size, Stockholm was Europe’s first “green” capital and maintains much of its natural splendor in the parks that cover one-third of the city. READ MORE

Museum of American Finance

Need a little more culture in your life? Get a behind-the-scenes look at the best museums in the country with our new At the Museum web series with Don Wildman, host of Mysteries at the Museum.

Get inside the mind of a spy at the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC.

Find your gross-out limit at Philadelphia’s Mutter Museum, full of outrageous medical oddities.

Learn about unknown animals at the world’s only Cryptozoology Museum, located in Portland, ME.

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British Museum in London

By Mommy Points

After an overnight flight from the US, we arrived in London to experience the magic of the Olympic Games.

Having been to the 1996 Atlanta Games, I think I was mentally prepared for a semi-repeat of that experience. I was just a teenager in 1996, but I distinctly remember the heat and the crowds.  However, London is dramatically different; it is almost chilly here, and while there are many people around, the city seems quite able to handle the crowds.  I was shocked when we breezed through London’s Heathrow Airport in a matter of mere minutes.

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Today marks the 50th anniversary of Marilyn Monroe’s tragic death. The air of mystery that surrounded her both in life and in death makes it difficult to not be intrigued by the sex symbol. To honor her, a special exhibition of 23 candid photos of Marilyn will be on display at the Phil Stern Gallery in Los Angeles, starting today.

But if you can’t be in LA to explore the actress’s life through photographs, then check out some of these destinations and relive her most famous films:

Star in your own larger-than-life version of the The Seven Year Itch by getting a photograph with the famous 26-foot-tall Marilyn statue, which now stands in Palm Springs, CA.

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Space is one of those destinations that will always fascinate, regardless of whether we’ll ever be able to go or not. (If you happen to have $200K lying around, then start planning your trip now!) But you can explore the history of space travel here on earth. The display of NASA’s space shuttle Enterprise opened last week at Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City.

In the Intrepid Museum’s Space Shuttle Pavilion, Enterprise — NASA’s very first space shuttle — is elevated 10 feet off the ground, so you can walk directly underneath it. An elevated viewing platform also allows you to get a better look. Intrepid Museum is one of the few places in the world to offer an up-close view of a space shuttle. READ MORE

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