ALL POSTS IN [Road Trips]

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Whether you’re in the mood for leaf peeping or you’re planning your next international getaway, you’ll want to check out Travel’s Best Road Trips 2014. Our coveted list includes the most picturesque and adventurous drives across the globe, from off-roading on the salt flats in Bolivia to an unexpected fall-foliage-inspired drive on the “Going to the Sun Road” in Glacier National Park.

Our panel of road-trip experts — including off-road explorer and host Don Wildman, Roadtrippers.com founder and CEO James Fisher, and cinematographer and road-tripper Allison Otto — not only shared their recommendations for the best drives in the world, but they also shared with us their favorite road-trip songs.  If you thought Don listens to classic rock cruising on his Harley, you’re right!  No matter where your travels take you, here’s our road trippin’ playlist to set the mood.

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Photo By: Jessica Menk

Asheville, NC: Known for having some of the best craft breweries on the East Coast, Asheville is an eclectic, artsy town that sits just outside the beautiful Great Smoky Mountains. You can feel the city’s entrepreneurial spirit as you explore its various neighborhoods. The town is locally driven from restaurants to antique shops. This adorable town should be on your must-see list. READ MORE

Road to Hana (Photo Courtesy of Chip Ward/ Equitrekking)

The island of Maui is amazing! Some people enjoy their Hawaiian vacation by simply relaxing on the beach while sipping a cold beverage, but there are several heart-pumping adventures that await adrenaline junkies on Maui, too. Here are 3 adventures you don’t want to miss when visiting this island paradise.

1. Go Road Trippin’ on the Road to Hana
The Hana Highway (Hwy. 36), which runs along the northeastern coast of Maui, is a thrilling road trip that the whole family can enjoy. Called “The Road to Hana,” this 52-mile coastal highway comprises more than 600 tummy-churning curves. Those who brave the route will be rewarded with dramatic coastal views and plenty of photo opportunities by beautiful waterfalls, lush rainforests, parks and gardens.

Top Travel Tip: Plan at least 3 hours to conquer the Road to Hana and take your time. This adventure is all about the journey and sightseeing along the way!
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Photography by Meg Haywood-Sullivan / Aurora Photos

Attention photographers and sunset gawkers: This scenic 80-foot waterfall is calling.

Daily Escapes!

Nissan Sport Sedan Concept (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

The 2014 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) has kicked into high gear this week, previewing some of the hottest cars of the new year, including the Nissan Sports Sedan, Cadillac ATS Coupe and the Lexus RC F. More than 5,000 journalists from 60 countries are attending the annual auto show at Detroit’s Cobo Center all week long.

The show started off Monday, giving media outlets a preview of all the bright, shiny and new automobiles before the show opens to the public Saturday, Jan. 18.

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Photography by Paul Giamou / Aurora Photos

The rugged abandon of California’s Central Coast has been given the cinematic treatment in Sundance darling and newly released Big Sur, starring Kate Bosworth. Based on Jack Kerouac’s eponymous novel, the film highlights the haunting beauty and isolated wilderness that drew the Beat writer to retreat here in the first place.

Relive it for yourself, or discover the splendor of the serpentine coast for the first time, on one of America’s most beloved road trips.

Nowhere is the Pacific Coast Highway’s winding roads more magnificent than along Big Sur’s craggy cliffs and crashing surf some 30 miles south of Carmel, CA.

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Alaska Day: Annual flag raising ceremony in Sitka, AK (Photo: Sitka CVB/William Greer)

Hooray for Alaska Day! All the talk of American exceptionalism may have taken a little hit lately, especially from our friends in Russia, but today there’s something to cheer about: In commemoration of the official transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States in 1867, a special ceremony will take place in the southeastern Alaskan town of Sitka. Down goes the Russian flag and up goes Old Glory at Castle Hill, one of the most historically important sites in Alaska, once occupied by the Tlingit, an indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and later by the Russians.

A Little Russia … in Alaska
No word on whether Putin will be on-hand for all the Alaska Day festivities. But hundreds of locals will be — receptions, auctions, barn dances, kayak races and a whole lot more are all planned, capping off a month-long series of events that have already included a hat tip to our Russian counterparts, like a Russian food festival (check out our own Russian food tour), as well as performances of traditional Russian folk dances and a tea break at the Russian Bishop’s House, one of the few surviving examples of Russian colonial architecture in the US.

But let’s be real: You didn’t come to Alaska to see Russia … not primarily, anyway. A trip to the Last Frontier State is probably on any outdoor lover’s bucket list. But just in case you can’t take advantage of all the Alaska travel discounts that typically accompany October, fear not — this is a good time to start planning a trip to America’s 49th state over the coming months. Here’s a primer of the best times to visit Alaska and special anniversaries ahead:

Winter Travel: November to April
November is a great time to see Alaska’s northern lights and share in the excitement of the Trail Sled Dog Race (the “Last Great Race on Earth,” from Anchorage to Nome). Plus, you can watch the World Ice Art Championships in Fairbanks (Alaska’s “Golden Heart City”). This season is also a great time to enjoy outdoor Alaskan activities such as heli-skiing in Alaska, as well as snowmobiling, snowshoeing and dog mushing.

Peak Season: Mid-May to Mid-September
You’ll be among the many visitors to Alaska during peak season, but for good reason: The days are at their longest, and the temperatures their warmest, affording plenty of opportunity for hiking, river-rafting, camping, fishing and flightseeing, as well as a chance to take an Alaska road trip.

Alaska’s Marine Highway System turned 50 this year. (Photo: State of Alaska/Reinhard Pantke)

Alaska Marine Highway System: Turns 50
Explore 31 ports of call in Alaska, courtesy of the Alaska Marine Highway System. Spanning an amazing 3,100 miles, this ferry service, which turns 50 this year, operates along Alaska’s south-central coast. Upon arrival in ports, offers visitors a variety of activities, such as authentic native culture (totem carvings, dances, traditional music and more), as well as day cruises with local tour operators, fishing charters and more.

Under-the-Radar National Parks
Sure, Denali is a once-in-a-lifetime trip. But don’t forget Alaska’s other national parks, especially in 2014, which marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, the 1964 federal law that protects nearly 110 million acres of wilderness in states throughout the US and is now considered one of America’s greatest conservation achievements. About 32 million of those acres can be found in Alaska — more than anywhere else in the country. Check out under-the-radar national parks like Gates of the Arctic, Lake Clark and Wrangell-St. Elias.

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Brown bears, bald eagles — explore Wild Alaska.

Delve into geologic history at Glacier Bay National Park.

Travel in style aboard a luxury cruise in Alaska.

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When we announced our Travel’s Best Fall Foliage Road Trips for 2013, we wanted to hear from our fans. We asked you what we missed on our list and for you to tell us your favorite fall foliage road trip. It was a landslide – The Great Smoky Mountains won out! Behind the Smoky Mountains, fans picked the Blue Ridge Parkway, between Virginia and North Carolina, as another popular spot for a leaf-peeping drive.

Unfortunately, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is closed due to the government shutdown, but you can’t let that stop you. Hop in your car and take in the scenery as you drive around Gatlinburg, a picturesque mountain town nestled in the scenic Smokies. Now is the perfect time — fall colors peak here in mid-October.

Gatlinburg offers more than just a spectacular autumn show. See what else there is to do in this boot-stomping town … other than ooh-ing and ahh-ing at the foliage, of course.

 

You May Also Like:
Travel’s Best Fall Foliage Road Trips
Great Smoky Mountains Road Trip
Things to Do in Gatlinburg

What’s not to love about fall? Crisp cool air, beautiful fall foliage, spooky sites and pumpkin-flavored food galore. There’s no shortage of ways to celebrate fall, but we whittled down our list to 7 of our favorite fall to-dos.

1.     Eat pumpkin … everything.

Ah, America’s favorite gourd — pumpkin! It’s everywhere and in everything this fall — pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin bagels, pumpkin fro-yo, the list is endless. If you’re gaga for this gourd, plan a day for picking your own pumpkins. Perhaps a 1,000-lbs. pumpkin will provide enough filling for your dishes this fall?

2.     Get lost in a corn maze.

Ever just want to get away … in a massive field of cornstalks? Now’s your chance to get lost in the coolest and creepiest corn mazes in the US. Can you make it all the way through 45 acres of twists and turns in the world’s largest corn maze? Just call us if you get lost.

3.     Get spooked at a vampire haunt.

The zombie fad may be passé this year, but the undead superstar that will never lose its appeal? Vampires. Sink your teeth into these vampire haunts around the world or follow the trail of literature’s greatest bloodsuckers with a vampire vacation.

4.     Take a leaf-peeping drive.

Nothing says fall more than leaf peeping, and what’s the best way to take in Mother Nature’s spectacular autumn show? On a road trip, of course. Get inspired with our favorite fall foliage drives and don’t forget to check the peak times before you go.

5.     Raise your steins for Oktoberfest.

Can’t make it to Germany for this annual beer-fueled fall festival? Get your brews and bratwurst at these Oktoberfest celebrations in the US or raise your steins at beer gardens around the world.

6.     Go apple picking.

If you gorged yourself on pumpkin and are craving another harvest favorite, head to these apple-picking farms.  Fun for the whole family, apple picking lets you enjoy the fruits of your labor at home with fall treats like apple pie, apple butter, cider and more.

7.     Make a campfire.

Instead of spending your nights staring at the TV (Breaking Bad is over after all this Sunday), take in a campfire. Fall is a perfect time for camping with its crisp, cool weather. Tell ghost stories and toast pumpkin s’mores over a raging fire (that you will safely put out before you go to bed, of course).

Tell Us: What’s on your fall to-do list?

 

Photography by Chad Ehlers / Stock Connection

Tangerine, rose, ruby and gold are just some of the colors that carpet the tree tops of New England in autumn. More »

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