ALL POSTS IN [Special Features]

Sedona, Arizona

Sedona is most famous for its stunning red rocks, which are particularly beautiful in the glow of sunrise and sunset, and have formed the backdrop for many a western film. The temperatures here are cooler than other Arizona destinations, thanks to the higher elevation, and Ponderosa Pines surround the city. It’s a hub for outdoor enthusiasts, with excellent biking, horseback riding and especially hiking. Some of the most popular hiking spots include Cathedral Rock, Bear Mountain, Bell Rock and Courthouse Rock.

The stunning desert-meets-forest scenery has, unsurprisingly, attracted many artists, and Sedona has become known for its numerous art galleries and craft shops. The inspiring setting has also drawn a New Age crowd; in the 1980s, the discovery of Sedona’s “vortexes” — concentrations of spiritual energy — caused alternative medicine peddlers, psychics, and vortex tour companies to make shop here.

L’Auberge de Sedona has one of the most stunning natural settings in not just the Southwest, but the country, with the picturesque Oak Creek running underneath shady trees, and Sedona’s soaring red rocks suspended in the background. Most of the luxe guest rooms and woodsy cottages come with fireplaces and private decks. It’s a popular spot for corporate retreats and romantic getaways. Families may want to check out the Village of Oak Creek — at the southernmost tip of Sedona — which offers restaurants, shops, hiking trails and Sedona’s only 18-hole public golf course. Las Posadas of Sedona is a quaint B&B in the area, with massive suites and freebies such as daily appetizers and cookies.

- Oyster.com Staff

It’s January, which means it’s time to put our New Year’s resolutions into action. Whether you are planning to travel more, hoping for a fresh start, or wanting to get away on your own, we’ve found some travel blogs that will help you achieve your travel goals.

The new year is a time to start off new and refreshed, so Fodor’s lists their top picks for the best places to get some quality R&R. Soak up the sun, relax in a blue lagoon, take in the stunning views, and you’ll be ready to face whatever 2013 throws at you.

READ MORE

It’s a huge weekend in DC, with over 100 different events happening throughout the city and the Metro system preparing for the over 800,000 people estimated to visit. If you’re one of the brave ones visiting DC this weekend – or any other weekend, for that matter — then let us help you get to know the nation’s capital, chockfull of sights, history and amazing food!

1. While you’re touring DC, solve a mystery at The International Spy Museum, which has the largest collection of international spy-related artifacts and immersive activities to enthrall children, as well as adults.

2. Why not stay in style while visiting the city of our country’s power players? Check out our picks for luxury accommodations.

3. Explore the beautifully historic neighborhood of Georgetown, and tour the favorite hangouts of former presidents — such as Bill Clinton, who graduated from Georgetown University in 1968.

4. Go sightseeing at one of the many monuments. Trust us, there are plenty of them – and they’re free!

5. Sip a coffee at Busboys and Poets, near the famous U Street, named for poet Langston Hughes, who worked as a busboy at the nearby Wardman Park Hotel.

6. Since you’ve traveled to DC to support the president, find out a little more about how the president, himself, travels.

7. Of course you need to eat! Find out what makes DC a great town for foodies with these top restaurants.

 

Photography by Oyster.com

Norway is best known for 2 things: Its jaw-dropping prices and its stunning natural beauty. For those who can afford to go, Norway offers a wealth of outdoor riches — dramatic, lush fjords; cascading waterfalls; red farmhouses in rolling valleys; and jagged mountain peaks. It also offers impressive history, and some visitors come primarily to see the wooden medieval stave churches around the country or the Viking ships on display in Oslo.

Understandably, the summer months are the most popular for tourists, and the long days mean it’s possible to pack in a lot of sightseeing. Visitors can partake in activities such as hiking, fishing, kayaking, and beach bumming (yes, there are beaches in Norway; the ones near Stavanger are quite nice). Fjord cruises are by far the most popular summer activity; for many, seeing the fjords is on the do-before-you-die list, and for good reason. But plenty of people (and Norwegians) spend the winter on the slopes.

For many visitors, Oslo is just a stopover city before heading to Norway’s more charming metropolises. But it nonetheless boasts plenty of sights and high-end hotels. The Carlton Oslo Hotel Guldsmeden is a quaint option, with 50 shabby-chic rooms and an eco-friendly philosophy.  Domestic flights are the easiest way to get from city to city, and Bergen is a popular home base for leisure visitors. The Radisson Blu Hotel Norge, Bergen is a family-friendly option, with a large swimming pool on-site, while the Clarion Collection Hotel is a romantic spot, with sexy décor and gorgeous city views.

- Oyster.com Staff

The weather is cold, but our hearts are warm thanks to our most popular pin on Pinterest this week: a shot of Italy from our 2013 Most Romantic Honeymoon Destinations. Obviously, Valentine’s Day is already on our minds, and not many places embody romance quite like Italy. We don’t blame you for daydreaming about riding a gondola through the canals of Venice, tossing coins over their shoulders into the Trevi Fountain or grabbing the perfect photo op overlooking Florence’s Arno River.

If you’re looking for a honeymoon that’s a little more out-of-the-box, check out our picks for Romantic Adventure Vacations and Unique Honeymoon Destinations. Don’t forget to check out all things Romance and Honeymoons on TravelChannel.com and follow our Romance and Honeymoons pinboard for your fix of dreamy destinations!

Melbourne may be Australia’s second largest city, but it’s number one as the country’s culture capital. Situated on Port Phillip Bay, it’s packed with Victorian buildings, museums, galleries, large parks and gardens. The tree-lined streets and green spaces create a clean, eco-friendly vibe, which is probably part of the reason Melbourne has consistently been dubbed as one of the world’s most livable cities.

The city’s roots can be traced back to the mid-1800s, when British settlers colonized the city after finding gold in the surrounding hills. Now, burgundy-colored (and free!) City Circle trams zig-zag across the metropolis, making it easy for visitors to explore the city at a relaxed pace within a few days. Business travelers will likely want to stay within the City Centre -– the Central Business District. As the city’s heart, the City Centre is also great option for those looking to be within walking distance of all the major sights. The 59-room Hotel Lindrum is a modern boutique hotel located just a short walk from sights such as Federation Square and Melbourne Park. It lacks a fitness center and spa, but the features it does have are done well: The restaurant serves a nice breakfast buffet, and the cozy bar features a fireplace and a billiards table. Round-the-clock room service is also available, and Wi-Fi is free throughout the hotel. Though its slightly south of the City Centre, St. Kilda Road Parkview Hotel offers a solid value, with contemporary rooms and a rooftop plunge pool.

- Oyster.com Staff

Buenos Aires

The capital of Argentina, Buenos Aires is home to many Argentine traditions and trademarks; the streets are lined by parrallias, or steakhouses, that serve up Argentina’s famous beef, luxury boutiques sell leather clothing and pieces by high-end designers, the nightlife is dominated by the tango and Evita’s “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” balcony overlooks the central square, Plaza de Mayo.

Though there are plenty of museums to visit in the city, Buenos Aires is a great place to explore by foot and simply wander around (the streets’ grid system makes it easy to explore). Known for its stunning architecture (gorgeous marble and bronze buildings line Avenida 9 de Julio, the widest boulevard in the world), Buenos Aires also boasts beautiful parks, particularly those in Palermo that include a museum, a planetarium and rose gardens. Outdoor markets are frequent occurences during the weekends and the cafe culture is a popular pastime — Portenos (as locals call themselves) can be seen sipping coffee with friends until the wee hours of the morning. So if you’re heading to Buenos Aires, be prepared to not get much sleep. Often referred to as the “Paris of South America,” the city has a lively nightlife that doesn’t get started until midnight, after locals and tourists have finished their late-night dinners.

Palermo is a popular area to stay in, as it boasts some of the city’s best restaurants, shops, and parks. A tranquil, minimalist vibe pervades the Awwa Suites & Spa. Its 60 large, bright rooms feature fully equipped kitchenettes, and the spa is comprised of a gorgeous indoor pool area, sauna and massage room. The nearby Livian Guest House is a funkier alternative, with just 8 artsy rooms in a French-inspired 1920s building Recoleta, a beautiful historic area, is also a nice spot to stay. Loi Suites Recoleta offer a solid value and convenient location, as well as a small pool, fitness center and full-service spa.

- Oyster.com Staff

Photography by REUTERS

The holidays are here, and our favorite travel blog posts have survived the ill-fated Mayan apocalypse to tell us about them. From where to celebrate and where to avoid (if you can), to what to do before the next end of days — check out this week in travel.

Gadling brings us the top holiday travel destinations. New York catapults to the top of the list for New Year’s Eve, but it doesn’t top the list overall.

Atlas Obscura peeks into the 5 swankiest bunkers for surviving the next apocalypse.

The Culture-ist finds out what to do if contract Giardia (a parasite found in contaminated food and water), are tricked by a bird poop scam or robbed while traveling — scary stuff.

Mighty Girl has her life list all planned out, even if it isn’t the end of days. Of her “100 Things To Do Before I Go,” how many can you check off?

Grantourismo explains why they are spending Christmas in Hanoi. See what happens when 2 of our favorite globetrotters decide to celebrate spontaneity.

See what else happened this week with our This Week in Photos gallery!

Cancun

There are 2 Cancuns: The Zona Hotelera in Isla Cancun, which is the mega-resort, mega-mall area that caters to mass tourism, and Ciudad Cancun, which is the original downtown area and where locals actually live and have their businesses. Thousands of spring breakers, honeymooners, old couples, families and young groups of friends flow into Cancun every year, making it one of the world’s top beach destinations. Its turquoise waters, beautiful stretches of sand, and night-long parties are a main draw here, but there’s a lot to do besides going to the beach. Cancun is the gateway to the breathtaking Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza and Tulum (Coba is also nearby, but is less well-preserved). Even for those planning to spend most of their time in lounge chair, these centuries-old archaeological sites are well worth a visit.

If all you need is a beautiful beach and a self-contained megaresort close to the party area, you’ll probably have a great time in the Hotel Zone. Le Blanc Spa Resort is a luxurious adults-only choice directly on a heavenly white-sand beach, with amenities such as a gorgeous spa and 3 outdoor pools. The nearby Gran Caribe Real is also a nice choice, but caters more to families with suite-style rooms, a kids’ club, and a waterpark. If you’d prefer a more authentic experience and don’t mind being a 10-minute cab ride from the beach, consider Ciudad Cancun. Here, you’ll find cheaper, smaller hotels, and a wide array of traditional and international restaurants and shops. The Radisson Hotel Hacienda is a decent budget option, with clean, spacious rooms and a nice pool.

- Oyster.com Staff

Photography by REUTERS/Mike Segar

This week, our favorite travel blog posts take a look at the people behind the industry. From an enlightening interview with the Frugal Traveler to the rudest airline employees, there’s never a dull moment with these travelers.

Gadling reports American Airlines has the rudest employees, according to a recent survey. Equally interesting is which carriers ranked the best.

Go Big or Go Home found the world’s largest group of carolers – 502, to be exact – in Westport, CT.
Nomadic Matt sits down with the Seth Kugel, NYT’s Frugal Traveler, to find out his most interesting trip (he’s been 3 times) and, of course, his best budget-friendly travel advice.

Carry On shares their 6 travel etiquette rules on the Today Show, just in time for holiday travel. No more wondering about who gets the armrest on a plane, how to silence noisy hotel neighbors and what to do about reckless taxi drivers.

Behold, Slate’s new photo blog, takes a look into the absurd world of fake holidays with shots from photographer Reiner Riedler’s new book, which was inspired by the temporary beaches in Berlin and Hamburg, Germany.

See what else happened this week — including romantic celebrations on 12/12/12 — with our This Week in Photos gallery!

Latest Pins on Pinterest

  • Chincoteague Island, VA

  • floridas finest wineries lakeride

  • New Paltz, NY

  • St. Lucia, Caribbean