ALL POSTS TAGGED "[Skiing]"

Photography by Paul Morrison

Does the approaching Winter Olympics have you dreaming of channeling your inner Olympian? With the State Department issuing a travel advisory last week cautioning Americans about terrorist attacks at the Winter Games, whether or not the warning will deter attendance next month remains to be seen. Regardless, if you can’t make it to Sochi, Russia to watch the pros at the 2014 Olympics, you can take an opportunity to ski with one a bit closer to home. Host of the last Winter Olympics, Whistler, British Columbia, is rolling out their Ski With an Olympian program for the second year in a row. Sign up and you’ll get a full day of skiing or snowboarding for groups of up to 5 people with an Olympic legacy as your personal guide.

How cool is it to get access to a pro like Rob Royd – the 3-time Olympian, 6-time World Championship athlete, and head coach for the Canadian Women’s National Ski Team — to ask him for pointers on upping your all-mountain skills? Or to hear Olympic insider stories over lunch with half-pipe and freestyle snowboarders such as Crispin Lipscomb or Tara Teigenm? Hop on the Peak 2 Peak Gondola, which connects Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains, and you’ll have plenty of time to listen to those Olympic stories while taking in the view. (It’s not only the highest lift in the world, but also the longest unsupported lift span on the planet!)

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Photography by Adam Clark / Aurora Photos

Utah skiers claim that they’ve found the “best snow on Earth,” and this picture just might prove it.

Daily Escapes!

Heli-skiing in the French Alps, it’s on your bucket list. Make it happen with a stay at Chalet Pelerin.
Daily Escapes!

Don’t underestimate Alpental, they say — only the most experienced skiers dare brave its wild unknown.

Daily Escapes!

Photography by Bruce Rowles

Bravo’s Real Housewives of Orange County heads to even colder territory tonight with a visit to the legendary snow-covered ski town of Whistler, British Columbia. Newbie Lydia, the sweet Canadian girl, wants the ladies to see her beautiful country in the hopes that the mountain air (and neutral vibe of Canada) will do the hot-tempered gals some good.

The snow bunnies don’t just drink wine in the lodge fireside all weekend. On this girls getaway, the Real Housewives get physical … with mountain sports, that is (their arguments continue to remain verbal slams). The ladies brace themselves for the freezing Canadian temps and hit the slopes on Whistler Blackcomb, two of the biggest vertical drops in North America, where Lydia snowboards and Vicki brags about her days on a ski team.

In the episode that airs tonight, the decked-out-in-fur housewives channel James Bond girls with a high-speed snowmobile tour. And it wouldn’t be a Real Housewives vacation without a few fights, like the one between Vicki and Lauri on the ski slopes.

Learning to ski can cause some epic meltdowns, even if you aren’t a reality star. Whistler PR supervisor Lauren Everest says the Whistler ski team enjoyed teaching the Real Housewives how to ski, even with the drama.

“Our expert snow school instructor Nadio made sure the ladies felt as comfortable as possible while learning a new sport,” says Everest. “The lesson got cut a bit short due to some drama while the cameras were rolling, but that’s what the show is all about … and why we love it when the Real Housewives come to town!”

After some heated discussions slopeside, the ladies whine and dine après-ski at The Bearfoot Bistro, one of Whistler’s hottest foodie scenes. The restaurant focuses on local in-season ingredients and features one of the world’s coldest ice bars, The Belvedere Ice Room, in which more than 50 vodkas are chilled in minus-25 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s almost as cold as one of Tamra’s “evil eyes.”

The second part of the Real Housewives’ ski trip airs tonight. We wonder: Will there be a massive snowball fight between Vicki and Lauri? Will Alexis run out of fur outfits to wear? Will Vicki’s maddening screams cause an avalanche? As Bravo says, we’ll have to watch what happens.

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Big Sky Resort

You may be tempted to ride the chairlift up and down Big Sky’s Lone Mountain just to take in Montana’s spectacular snowscapes. But if you have to ski, you might as well do it here, too. More »

Warm, cold, cold, warm. Make up your mind already!

It’s safe to say that’s what a whole lot of people are thinking across the country, as they don fall jackets one day, winter coats the next. Winter, it seems, has become a little moody, and no one is feeling the brunt of its mood swings more than ski resorts.

“Rising Temperatures Threaten Fundamental Change for Ski Slopes,” reported yesterday’s New York Times. “Study Shows Warming’s Threat to Skiing,” said The Aspen Times, just a few days earlier. And this equally sobering take from Bloomberg: “Ski Areas Face $1 Billion Risk From Warming Climate, Groups Say.”

But Wait, There’s Hope!

Before you reach for your Xanax, take a deep breath and repeat: “There’s still hope for fun on the slopes this year.”

Sure, we’re all feeling a little nervous, especially with still-fresh memories of last year’s unseasonably warm winter — the fourth warmest on record since 1896 — that caused half of the nation’s ski areas to open late and nearly as many to close early. This year is seeing more unpredictable temperature shifts in areas from Mount Sunapee in Vermont, where warmer temps have turned some usually snow white trails dirt brown, to several ski resorts in Colorado that have been forced to push back their opening dates.

A Pro Colorado Skier’s Opinion

Lou Dawson — no, not a climate guy, but he is the first person to ski all 54 of Colorado’s 14,000-foot peaks — seems pretty optimistic about the whole thing. From what we can tell over at Lou’s popular Wild Snow blog, he’s got strong opinions on how ski resorts can withstand climate change.

Here’s what Lou’s saying: “If ski resorts want to deal with global warming and continue skiing as we know it, they need to figure out where we can ski as the climate warms, and build or extend ski areas into those zones.”

Snowiest Ski Resorts — Where Are They?

So where are those “zones”? Leave it to our friends over at weathertrends360 to gather the goods. Recently, these weather gurus compiled their list of the world’s snowiest ski resorts, with their selection based upon long-term weather trends forecasts.

And the slopes with the most guaranteed powder? Places such as Alta, UT, make weathertrends360’s list – and as the NYT confirmed this week, this famed ski area, now in its 75th year, is seeing trails with a base depth of 48 inches. (Translation: Anything above 15 inches is sufficient for skiing.)

What other ski resorts made the list? For the full forecast, check out the World’s Snowiest Ski Resorts.

By Oyster.com Staff

Park City

Park City is Utah’s version of Aspen, though most would argue that its more laid-back than its Colorado counterpart. Considered one of the best places in the world to ski, Park City attracts tons of skiers and snowboarders with its fresh powder. Celebrities also flock to Park City during the winter — some for the slopes, but many for the Sundance Film Festival in January.

There are actually 3 distinct ski resorts in Park City, with distinct reputations: Park City Mountain is known as the party spot, while Deer Valley is for the rich and famous, and The Canyons attracts numerous families, being home to the largest mountain in the area as well as more casual, family-friendly accommodations. Bear Hollow Village is a neighborhood-like resort in The Canyons, featuring 3-bedroom condos and 3- and 4-bedroom townhouses. The individually owned condos and townhouses vary in decor and modernity, but all feature fireplaces, washer/dryers, sleek kitchens, and often reasonable rates. The nearby Waldorf Astoria, on the other hand, is luxurious in every way, starting with the beautiful lobby — crystal chandeliers hang from the high beamed ceilings, antlers protrude from the walls (a must in Park City) and leather and dark-wood accents give a dramatic but warm feel.

Deer Valley is the ultra-luxe option in Park City. Sidewalks are heated, restaurants are tres chic, and ski valets are free (but snowboarding is prohibited on the mountain). The 170-room Stein Eriksen Lodge offers ski-in, ski-out access to Deer Valley Resort, and has a design style that could be described as “wilderness chic.” It’s popular among couples for its romantic spa, 2 restaurants and year-round outdoor pool. The nearbySt. Regis, complete with elegant rooms and gorgeous views, is one of the only properties in the area that compares.

Ski resorts, located along the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California, are attracting more skiers and snowboarders after record snowfalls. The Sierra typically gets snowfall in April, but this season the area has seen more than 61 feet of snow — just a few feet shy of the 65-feet record set from 1950 to 1951.

Ski patrol guides had to create tunnels to reach their warming huts, and avalanches broke out windows at two life stations at Squaw Valley, home of the 1960 Winter Olympics. According to Associated Press, almost 59 feet of snow has fallen there, breaking the old record of 29 inches.

The unexpected snowfall has sparked Squaw Valley to extend its season through Memorial Day, and Heavenly Mountain Resort, on Mammoth Mountain, may remain open through the 4th of July.

Despite the booming business at ski resorts, the snow is causing problems, including roof damage for some homeowners and businesses. The good news is that the snow has increased California’s water supply, which may spark Gov. Jerry Brown to declare the end to state’s lingering drought.

Julia Mancuso

Our super ski-travel blogger, Julia Mancuso, has had some early success at the FIS world ski championships in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. On the first day of competition Tuesday, Julia finished second in the super-G, a speed event that includes tighter turns than a downhill race.

We prefer to think that Julia’s association with TravelChannel.com, which began in December, has brought her good luck. But she won three previous world championship medals before she started blogging for us. Julia also has won three Olympic medals, including gold in the giant slalom at the 2006 Turin Olympics and two silvers at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.

Julia is planning to compete in three of the four remaining events at worlds–the downhill, the super combined and the giant slalom. The championships end February 20.

You can read Julia’s blog on TravelChannel.com and get updates about her performances at worlds from her website.

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