ALL POSTS TAGGED "[wildlife]"

Sometimes bear hugs are a necessity. With temperatures averaging around 20 below in the winter, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a good place for snuggling .

Daily Escapes!

Wildlife adventurer Jessica Pociask curls up with a Harp Seal pup on the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

With her passion for wildlife adventures, from jungle trekking in Uganda to see mountain gorillas or curling up with lemurs in Madagascar, Jessica Pociask is our type of traveler.

As the owner of WANT Expeditions — Wildlife and Nature Travel, a conservation-oriented, expedition-style adventure travel company — Jessica leads tours to see the most amazing natural phenomena on Earth.  Jessica has been to over 70 countries, leading expeditions all over the world, and has visited all 7 continents. She has studied climate change in Antarctica, and she was one of 50 women chosen from the US and Mexico for the Women’s Leadership and International Sustainable Development award by the National Wildlife Federation.

Jessica “photo bombs” a giant tortoise in the Galapagos.

A biologist by trade, Jessica recently spoke on a panel with distinguished conservationists and biologists regarding the impact of tourism on conservation at the Wildlife Conservation Film Festival.

And where is Jessica currently? Oh, just leading a tour in Ecuador to see the first new carnivore species found in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years — the olinguito.

Traveling Type: How did you get your start leading wildlife and nature tours?

Jessica Pociask: It’s a long, convoluted story that probably started when I made my first insect collection somewhere around the age of 7. Over the next 20 years, fueled by stories in my grandfather’s collection of National Geographic magazines, I was inspired with the idea of being an explorer and adventurer. I took my first trip abroad when I was 16, and I once traveled with an orchestra through Europe. From there on, I was smitten with traveling, so I began working for various conservation organizations and outdoor outfitters and started traveling abroad independently. READ MORE

Photography by Nigel Pavitt / JWL / Aurora Photos

Rhino sightings are exceedingly rare — the total population in Masai Mara National Reserve is thought to total 50. More »

Photography by andBeyond Ngorongoro Crater Lodge

The area is home to nearly 25,000 animals, which means you’ll have little trouble spotting the “Big 5” — lion, rhino, leopard, elephant and Cape buffalo. More »

Photography by Tim Martin / Aurora Photos

Waves crashing, frigates soaring, albatrosses gliding to an elegant landing on a nearby island, and the sea wind whipping around you like briny caresses. More »

 

Photography by Michael S. Nolan / SpecialistStock / Aurora Photo

“Me first.” “No, I’m going first.” One, 2, 3, JUMP! How do these southern rockhopper penguins, who jump over obstacles instead of sliding around them like many penguin species, decide who jumps first? One of nature’s many little mysteries. More »

Photography by Paul Souders | WorldFoto

 

You’ll certainly want to bring a jacket for your visit to this snow-capped island off the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, as temperatures can dip to 14 degrees Fahrenheit. More »

Today’s Daily Escape is Horning’s Hideaway in North Plains, Oregon. More »

Photograph by Jan Sonnenmair / Aurora Photos

 

Today’s Daily Escape is a Dolphin Adventure in Tiputa, Tahiti. More »

 Photograph by Zac Macaulay / Cultura / Aurora Photos

Photo Courtesy of Lindsay Blatt / Herd In Iceland

We asked filmmakers Lindsay Blatt and Paul Taggert to share their experience filming their documentary Herd In Iceland. They told us all about the traditions of the herders they encountered, the beauty of the countryside and the rich culture hidden away in the cities and farms of Iceland.

Iceland is an island nation of approximately 300,000 people and 80,000 horses, on a parcel of land about the size of Kentucky.  Our documentary Herd In Iceland began filming in 2010, with a return trip in the fall of 2011.  The film tells the story of the Icelandic herders, whose sheep and semi-wild horses spend their summers grazing in the highlands, free to roam and raise their young.  Every September, farm owners from each county ride into the mountains to collect their herds and bring them home for the winter.  The film documents this historic tradition, and shows the special relationship the people have with their hardy and curious horses.
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